Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for complete course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

History of Modern Medicine
AS.140.106 (05)

The history of Western medicine from the Enlightenment to the present, with emphasis on ideas, science, practices, practitioners, and institutions, and the relationship of these to the broad social context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of Modern Medicine
AS.140.106 (04)

The history of Western medicine from the Enlightenment to the present, with emphasis on ideas, science, practices, practitioners, and institutions, and the relationship of these to the broad social context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Rise of Modern Science
AS.140.302 (02)

Survey of important achievements in modern science from Newton to the Hubble Space Telescope, with topics drawn from physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, and geology. Examines how science has shaped the modern world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

History of Modern Medicine
AS.140.106 (02)

The history of Western medicine from the Enlightenment to the present, with emphasis on ideas, science, practices, practitioners, and institutions, and the relationship of these to the broad social context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Rise of Modern Science
AS.140.302 (01)

Survey of important achievements in modern science from Newton to the Hubble Space Telescope, with topics drawn from physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, and geology. Examines how science has shaped the modern world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Ancient Medicine
AS.130.119 (01)

A survey of medicine and medical practice in the ancient Near East and, to a lesser extent, the Aegean world. The abundant sources range from magical spells to surprisingly “scientific” treatises and handbooks. Readings are selected from translations of primary sources in the writings of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Topics will include the sources of our knowledge; the nature of medical practitioners, medical treatment, and surgery; beliefs about disease and the etiology of illness; concepts of contagion and ritual purity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/100
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

History of Modern Medicine
AS.140.106 (03)

The history of Western medicine from the Enlightenment to the present, with emphasis on ideas, science, practices, practitioners, and institutions, and the relationship of these to the broad social context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of Modern Medicine
AS.140.106 (01)

The history of Western medicine from the Enlightenment to the present, with emphasis on ideas, science, practices, practitioners, and institutions, and the relationship of these to the broad social context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Science and Technology in Slave Regimes
AS.140.328 (01)

What does science and technology look like in slave regimes? This seminar explores this question from a trans-national perspective by comparing cases in the Antebellum US, Cuba, Brazil and other countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM

Humanoid Robots in Global History
AS.140.341 (01)

Humanoid machines reflect their creators’ ideals of humanity. Comparing examples from societies across the globe we will investigate what factors shaped these ideals, and how they manifested in technological design.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

"We Came in Peace for All Mankind": America's Space Program in Historical Context
AS.140.342 (01)

For sixty years space exploration has been a fundamental part of American identity and culture, its imagery and rhetoric invoked everywhere from the Halls of Congress to movie theaters and shopping malls. When, how, and why did spaceflight become central to our nation’s sense of self? We will answer this question through a survey of the history of space exploration and, by proxy, of the United States. America’s celestial achievements are in every way a reflection of its terrestrial concerns: domestic politics, international relations, capitalism, civil rights, science, and contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Plagues, Power, and Social Control
AS.230.306 (01)

While developments in biomedicine and health care have led to the eradication, cure and management of many human health problems, disease, illness and health have also been the focus for aggressive social controls and population management. The technologies and practices of disease control and health management have been foundational to some of the most aggressive structures of oppression in recent history such as the Jewish Ghetto, the Concentration Camp, the South African Township and techniques of segregation. This course seeks to explore how epidemics and disease control are linked to larger questions of power, state craft and international dynamics. This course asks how have outbreaks of infectious disease shaped social and political action? How do societies respond to outbreaks and why? What do epidemic moments tell us about global structures of power and the dynamics of control? Drawing on historical cases including plague during the European Renaissance and before, the HIV/AIDS Pandemic and the West African Ebola Outbreak of 2013-2016, this course will introduce students to the history and practices of disease control as well as important theoretical perspectives by which to understand the sociological and historical effects of disease and the responses to them. Students will engage sociological concepts such as biopolitics, social construction of disease and illness and biosecurity and produce a final research paper examining the outcomes and responses to an epidemic event to show mastery of the topics covered in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Ways of Knowing: New Histories of Science, Medicine, and Technology
AS.140.435 (01)

What does it mean for science to have a history? Comparing newer approaches with classic works, we will explore different strategies for placing science, medicine, and technology in social context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Research Seminar
AS.140.412 (01)

Departmental Majors Writing a Senior Thesis Only

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of the Earth and Environment
AS.140.388 (01)

The earth we know today is very different from that which scientists debated little more than 100 years ago. While scientists today hold the earth to be roughly 4.5 billion years old, at the turn of the 20th century there was little agreement about the earth’s age, and geologists’ estimates did not exceed 100 million years. And while today scientists agree that the continents sit atop lithospheric plates that move and interact, giving rise to volcanoes, earthquakes, mountain ranges, and deep ocean trenches, the earth of the 19tth-century was one that was slowly cooling and shrinking. In addition to getting older and less static, the earth of the 20th century also yielded up some of its uniqueness, as it ceased to be the only planet under the purview of those fields that would collectively become known as the earth and planetary sciences. A Cold War program in planetary exploration of the Moon, Mars and Venus extended inquiry into the other rocky bodies of the solar system and placed what was known about the earth into a broader context. Finally, an environmental movement and the discovery of anthropogenic climate change showed the earth to be more vulnerable and susceptible to human activities than previously imagined. These changes not only affected our intellectual understanding of the earth, they also came along with changes in the way we as a society conceptualize the nature of global problems, their causes and their impacts. In this course we will examine our changing view of the earth and the world in the 20th century with a focus on the interrelatedness of science, society, and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Individualized Medicine from Antiquity to the Genome Age
AS.140.391 (01)

A seminar for advanced undergraduates. We explore the notion of the individual in medicine over twenty-five centuries, from the Hippocratics to the invention of the case study during the Renaissance to the current JHU medical curriculum. The history of medicine survey, AS.140.105 or AS.140.106, is recommended though not required. Graduate students are welcomed but should expect to do additional work and readings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.140.106 (05)History of Modern MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMComfort, NathanielGilman 50
AS.140.106 (04)History of Modern MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMComfort, NathanielGilman 50
AS.140.302 (02)Rise of Modern ScienceMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMKingsland, Sharon EGilman 132GECS-SOCSCI
AS.140.106 (02)History of Modern MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMComfort, NathanielGilman 50
AS.140.302 (01)Rise of Modern ScienceMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMKingsland, Sharon EGilman 132GECS-SOCSCI
AS.130.119 (01)Ancient MedicineMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, RichardGilman 50NEAS-HISCUL
AS.140.106 (03)History of Modern MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMComfort, NathanielGilman 50
AS.140.106 (01)History of Modern MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMComfort, NathanielGilman 50
AS.140.328 (01)Science and Technology in Slave RegimesW 1:30PM - 3:50PMKargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria MGilman 300INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM
AS.140.341 (01)Humanoid Robots in Global HistoryM 3:00PM - 5:20PMFrumer, YuliaGilman 377
AS.140.342 (01)"We Came in Peace for All Mankind": America's Space Program in Historical ContextTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMargolis, EmilyGilman 300
AS.230.306 (01)Plagues, Power, and Social ControlT 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, AlexandreShaffer 202INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.140.435 (01)Ways of Knowing: New Histories of Science, Medicine, and TechnologyT 1:30PM - 3:50PMFrumer, Yulia, Greene, JeremyGilman 300MSCH-HUM
AS.140.412 (01)Research SeminarMercelis, Joris Hans Angele 
AS.140.388 (01)History of the Earth and EnvironmentTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMShindell, MatthewGilman 134ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.140.391 (01)Individualized Medicine from Antiquity to the Genome AgeT 4:30PM - 6:50PMComfort, Nathaniel, Pomata, GiannaGilman 300MSCH-HUM

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Science, Medicine, and Society
AS.140.219 (11)

This course will examine some of the major developments in medicine, as well as in the biological and natural sciences, in the 19th and 20th centuries, and will explore the social context in which these ideas arose. Among the topics that we will discuss are Darwinian evolutionary theory, the rise of modern genetics, and the development of biomedical technologies, such as CRISPR. We additionally will examine the social and bioethical dimensions of these scientific developments.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.140.219 (11)Science, Medicine, and SocietyTTh 1:00PM - 5:30PMRaymer, Emilie JosephineGilman 55

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (02)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (06)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (01)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (04)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (05)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Science: Antiquity To Renaissance
AS.140.301 (01)

The first part of a three-part survey of the history of science. This course deals with the origins, practice, ideas, and cultural role of scientific thought in Graeco-Roman, Arabic/Islamic, and Medieval Latin/Christian societies. Interactions across cultures and among science, art, technology, and theology are highlighted.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshmen Seminar: Techno-ethics
AS.140.177 (01)

We are all familiar with bio-ethics: dealing with living subjects is an enterprise prone to ethically questionable practices, and we have learned the hard way to raise the ethical questions regarding biomedical projects. But what about technology? Can technology be unethical? Sure, one can design technologies of pain and destruction, or simply ignore regulations and make unsafe products—those technologies would be unquestionably unethical. But what if somebody comes up with new technology with the best intentions in mind? Could those technologies be ethically unsound? In addition to learning the skills required in college, academia, and professional world, the freshman seminar on Techno-ethics will explore the ethical issues involved in technological designs. Students will learn how to identify groups of people who could be harmed by technologies, how to detect factors that may result in unethical use of technologies, and how to pay attention to social dynamics that could turn even useful technologies into a nightmare.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of Science: Antiquity To Renaissance
AS.140.301 (02)

The first part of a three-part survey of the history of science. This course deals with the origins, practice, ideas, and cultural role of scientific thought in Graeco-Roman, Arabic/Islamic, and Medieval Latin/Christian societies. Interactions across cultures and among science, art, technology, and theology are highlighted.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (03)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Science: Antiquity To Renaissance
AS.140.301 (03)

The first part of a three-part survey of the history of science. This course deals with the origins, practice, ideas, and cultural role of scientific thought in Graeco-Roman, Arabic/Islamic, and Medieval Latin/Christian societies. Interactions across cultures and among science, art, technology, and theology are highlighted.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Technology and Global Health
AS.140.162 (01)

This course explores the intersection of technology and health through three main phases in the history of global health: colonial medicine from the 19th century to the mid-20th century, international health in the post-World War II era, and global health from the late 20th century to the present day. Through background lectures and seminar discussions, students will consider how technologies for health are designed, developed, distributed, used, and discarded. We will ask questions such as: How and why were certain technologies chosen over others? How and why has the use of technology in international health programs changed over time? How have medical technologies been transferred between geographic, social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental contexts? This course is a first year seminar, designed to develop students’ understanding of how to conduct historical scholarship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ecology, Health, and the Environment
AS.140.311 (01)

Explores diverse problems linking ecological, environmental and public health themes, with focus on Chesapeake region. Students’ research projects can be outside Chesapeake region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The Knowledge City: from Silicon Valley to Bloomberg’s New York
AS.140.401 (01)

This seminar will explore the increasingly productive relationship between research universities and urban and regional development in the period after World War II to the present. Working with the faculty, participants will be expected to develop a research paper. Discussion, presentations, lectures.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ladies in the Laboratory: Science and Gender in U.S. History
AS.140.380 (01)

Why has science historically been so dominated by men? Why is this still true for many STEM fields today? We will explore the answers to these questions in this course, as well as look at a broader history of women and gender in science in the United States. Because education continues to be crucial in pushing people into or out of scientific careers, this course will also feature a large focus on K-12, college, and graduate science education.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Prosthetics and Technologies of Disability
AS.140.395 (01)

The purpose of prosthetics seems to be fairly straightforward—to restore function that was lost due to the loss of a body part. According to this logic, the quality of prosthetics is measured in its ability to replicate lost human function and restore individuals with disabilities to normalcy. And indeed, numerous disability technologies enrich the experience of individuals in need of them. At the same time, these very technologies are often perceived as a marker of something abnormal, or, by the nature of their design prove to be an obstacle for mobility and access. Therefore, as much as prosthetics and other technologies of disabilities improve the quality of life, they also led to stigmatization, marginalization, and exclusion. By looking at prosthetics and disability in a variety of historical contexts, we will learn what kind of ideas of ‘normalcy’ they reflect, and how they shape the experience of individuals who use them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Technology and the Making of the Modern World
AS.140.393 (01)

This course critically examines the role of technology in some of the main developments that have shaped the modern world, ranging from industrialization and globalization processes to the rise of new political ideologies and gender patterns. This course is co-taught by an instructor from the Smithsonian Institution and will include a public history research project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Research Seminar
AS.140.411 (01)

For majors pursuing independent research.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Man vs. Machine: Resistance to New Technology since the Industrial Revolution
AS.140.356 (01)

This course analyzes different episodes of “luddism” in the history of science and technology, from the destruction of textile machinery in the early 1800s up to recent controversies about biotechnology and ICT.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/13
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Experimental Bodies: Histories of Human Subjects Research in the 19th and 20th Centuries
AS.140.314 (01)

This course traces the history of human subjects research as a medical and scientific practice. It will focus on the human subjects themselves, and how their experiences intersect with the histories of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Earth Stewardship: A History of Environmentalism in the Atomic Age
AS.140.417 (01)

Explores the history of environmentalism and the roots of modern concepts of sustainability, resilience, and Earth Stewardship. Focuses especially on problems emerging after 1945. Students will do research projects, with options for doing traditional expository writing or a creative arts project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Heredity, Eugenics, and Society
AS.140.394 (01)

In this course, we will examine the ways in which concepts of the gene, heredity, and innateness have both shaped and been shaped by society over the last two-plus centuries. Topics under discussion may include: eugenics, biological determinism, scientific racism, human breeding programs, genetics and gender, genetics and intelligence, genetic engineering including CRISPR, assisted reproductive technologies, sociogenomics, and polygenic risk scores. Term paper. AS.140.106 recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The University and Society
AS.190.471 (01)

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.140.105 (02)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (06)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (01)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (04)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (05)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.301 (01)History of Science: Antiquity To RenaissanceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFerrario, Gabriele, Principe, LawrenceHodson 313
AS.140.177 (01)Freshmen Seminar: Techno-ethicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFrumer, YuliaKrieger Laverty
AS.140.301 (02)History of Science: Antiquity To RenaissanceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFerrario, Gabriele, Principe, LawrenceHodson 313
AS.140.105 (03)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFissell, Mary EGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.301 (03)History of Science: Antiquity To RenaissanceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFerrario, Gabriele, Principe, LawrenceHodson 313
AS.140.162 (01)Technology and Global HealthTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMorefield, Heidi Anna 
AS.140.311 (01)Ecology, Health, and the EnvironmentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsland, Sharon EGilman 300GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.140.401 (01)The Knowledge City: from Silicon Valley to Bloomberg’s New YorkM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKargon, Robert HGilman 217
AS.140.380 (01)Ladies in the Laboratory: Science and Gender in U.S. HistoryMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMBehrman, Joanna FGilman 300
AS.140.395 (01)Prosthetics and Technologies of DisabilityT 3:00PM - 5:30PMFrumer, YuliaGilman 300
AS.140.393 (01)Technology and the Making of the Modern WorldW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMercelis, Joris Hans Angele, Molella, ArthurGilman 377
AS.140.411 (01)Senior Research SeminarMercelis, Joris Hans Angele 
AS.140.356 (01)Man vs. Machine: Resistance to New Technology since the Industrial RevolutionM 3:00PM - 5:20PMMercelis, Joris Hans AngeleKrieger 302GECS-SOCSCI
AS.140.314 (01)Experimental Bodies: Histories of Human Subjects Research in the 19th and 20th CenturiesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMNuriddin, AyahGilman 300
AS.140.417 (01)Earth Stewardship: A History of Environmentalism in the Atomic AgeM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsland, Sharon EGilman 300ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.140.394 (01)Heredity, Eugenics, and SocietyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMComfort, NathanielMaryland 109
AS.190.471 (01)The University and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert HGilman 381INST-AP