Undergraduate Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for complete course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Sex, Death, and Gender: The Body in Premodern Art, Medicine, and Culture, c. 1300-1600
AS.010.339 (01)

To what extent was the body and its depiction a site of contestation, identification, or desire in the Middle Ages and Renaissance? If the body in the West since the 1800s is seen to have been shaped by the rise of photography and film, the institutionalization of biomedicine, and the establishment of techniques of surveyance and mechanization, then how was the body represented, disciplined, and experienced in the preceding centuries? In an age of unprecedented encounter with non-European bodies, what did it mean to describe and categorize bodies by race, region, or religion? These are some of the major questions this class seeks to answer, which is fundamentally interdisciplinary as it draws upon insights and methods from anthropology and the history of medicine and history of science to investigate how the body has been represented and imagined in the visual arts. The bodies of the suffering Christ, the female mystic, the dissected cadaver, the punished criminal, and the non-European ‘Other’ will loom large as we work to problematize notions of a normative body, whether in the premodern world or in the contemporary one. While most readings and lectures will concern the body and its representation in the Christian West during the later Middle Ages and Renaissance, students are encouraged to work on a topic of their choosing from any geographical area 1000-1800 CE for their research papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Allsopp, Ben William
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (01)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (02)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (03)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (04)

Course provides an introduction to health and healing in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Topics include religion and medicine; medicine in the Islamicate world; women and healing; patients and practitioners.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Science: Antiquity To Renaissance
AS.140.301 (01)

The first part of a three-part survey of the history of science. This course deals with the origins, practice, ideas, and cultural role of scientific thought in Graeco-Roman, Arabic/Islamic, and Medieval Latin/Christian societies. Interactions across cultures and among science, art, technology, and theology are highlighted.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Principe, Lawrence
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Science: Antiquity To Renaissance
AS.140.301 (02)

The first part of a three-part survey of the history of science. This course deals with the origins, practice, ideas, and cultural role of scientific thought in Graeco-Roman, Arabic/Islamic, and Medieval Latin/Christian societies. Interactions across cultures and among science, art, technology, and theology are highlighted.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Principe, Lawrence
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

The Hydrologic Sphere: Histories of Water in the Colonial and Postcolonial World
AS.140.317 (01)

Water supplies are becoming scarcer globally due to climate change. We use clean water—fresh and salt—in a variety of ways that provide comfort, stability, and health, making it one of the most valuable commodities on Earth. While countries in the Global North are beginning to see more frequent and lengthier droughts, those in the Latin America, Africa, and South Asia have long struggled over how to distribute and use their clean water supplies. This class will examine how colonialism and its far-reaching effects have created an environment of scarce water supplies in many areas of the world. Water access is difficult to achieve, but for much of the Global South, the colonial period helped craft the problems we see today. This class will ask what colonial and postcolonial technologies’ construction and use teach us about equitable clean water distribution, how social and cultural identities influence water supplies and use, and why water has been such an important element—and commodity—in our world, especially where Europeans settled and oppressed local populations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Brig, Kristin Victoria
  • Room: Shriver Hall Board Room
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Science and Utopia
AS.140.327 (01)

This seminar will explore the complex interaction between science, technology and utopian/dystopian thought from the late nineteenth century. Major utopians will include Bellamy, H.G. Wells, Mark Twain, Frank Lloyd Wright, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Sinclair Lewis, B.F. Skinner, Margaret Atwood, and Walt Disney.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Gilman 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/16
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Women, Health, and Medicine in Colonial and Antebellum America
AS.140.329 (01)

This class will examine the history of women’s health and medicine in America from the 17th century to the mid-19th century, a period in which settler colonialism and the trans-Atlantic slave trade mixed European, Indigenous American, and African people and belief systems, resulting in diverse healing practices and understandings of the body and gender. Major themes addressed in the course include reproductive health, domestic and “alternative” medicine, as well as enslavement, racialized medicine, poverty, disability, and sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Clark, Emily Jeannine
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Photography in Science and Medicine (19th Century-Present)
AS.140.335 (01)

How did photography change science and medicine, and vice versa? This course explores how and why photography and related imaging techniques became central to a broad variety of fields of science and medicine, ranging from anthropology and astronomy to embryology, nuclear physics, and radiology. It also considers how these techniques were created in the first place and to what extent they affected the standing of photography as an “art-science.” Central themes will include (among others) the status and objectivity of photographic evidence; the historical relationships between technical, scientific, and artistic change; the role of photography in disseminating scientific and medical knowledge and (mis)information; the racial and gender biases of scientific and medical photography; and photography’s use as a tool of scientific exploration, measurement, and surveillance. Students will be developing their own research projects in consultation with the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mercelis, Joris Hans Angele
  • Room: Gilman 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Unsafe America: Accidents, Disasters, and Society, 1800–2020
AS.140.338 (01)

According to the latest data from the National Safety Council, accidents cause over 173,000 deaths and 48,300,000 injuries per year across the United States. Since the nineteenth century, accidents ranging from burns to car crashes to the Three Mile Island nuclear disaster have become increasingly central to American life. This course examines the history of accidents and why Americans have chosen to control some hazards but not others. We will investigate how accidents have changed over time alongside the introduction and spread of new technologies; cultural beliefs about safety; the economic and political interests of different stakeholders; and the efforts of safety experts, nonprofits, corporations, families, and the government to protect Americans from harm. On one level, this course traces the unexpected consequences of remaking the United States with modern industry, transportation, infrastructure, and consumer products. At the same time, it captures how the principles of free enterprise and personal responsibility continue to influence the American safety movement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Parry, Alexander Ian
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Senior Research Seminar
AS.140.411 (01)

For History of Science, Medicine, and Technology majors preparing a senior honors thesis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Mercelis, Joris Hans Angele
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Health, Science, Environment
AS.145.106 (01)

Environment has an inexorable effect on human health, and certain human activities have had outsized impacts on the natural world and the ability of forms of life to thrive. This course brings medical humanities, history of science, and science & technology studies into conversation with environmental humanities to ask: how have our conceptions of the natural world emerged, and how have these shaped our understandings of bodies, ecologies, and health outcomes? How do we know and measure the environment and health, and to what effects? How have human and ecological health affected environmental politics? How have writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? What can we learn from case studies of health and environment in Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay as well as in global contexts? Course topics will include ecology, epigenetics, toxicity, agriculture and food, radiation, air quality, and more-than-human entanglements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, Nicole
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Health, Science, Environment
AS.145.106 (02)

Environment has an inexorable effect on human health, and certain human activities have had outsized impacts on the natural world and the ability of forms of life to thrive. This course brings medical humanities, history of science, and science & technology studies into conversation with environmental humanities to ask: how have our conceptions of the natural world emerged, and how have these shaped our understandings of bodies, ecologies, and health outcomes? How do we know and measure the environment and health, and to what effects? How have human and ecological health affected environmental politics? How have writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? What can we learn from case studies of health and environment in Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay as well as in global contexts? Course topics will include ecology, epigenetics, toxicity, agriculture and food, radiation, air quality, and more-than-human entanglements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, Nicole
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Health, Science, Environment
AS.145.106 (03)

Environment has an inexorable effect on human health, and certain human activities have had outsized impacts on the natural world and the ability of forms of life to thrive. This course brings medical humanities, history of science, and science & technology studies into conversation with environmental humanities to ask: how have our conceptions of the natural world emerged, and how have these shaped our understandings of bodies, ecologies, and health outcomes? How do we know and measure the environment and health, and to what effects? How have human and ecological health affected environmental politics? How have writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? What can we learn from case studies of health and environment in Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay as well as in global contexts? Course topics will include ecology, epigenetics, toxicity, agriculture and food, radiation, air quality, and more-than-human entanglements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, Nicole
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Health, Science, Environment
AS.145.106 (04)

Environment has an inexorable effect on human health, and certain human activities have had outsized impacts on the natural world and the ability of forms of life to thrive. This course brings medical humanities, history of science, and science & technology studies into conversation with environmental humanities to ask: how have our conceptions of the natural world emerged, and how have these shaped our understandings of bodies, ecologies, and health outcomes? How do we know and measure the environment and health, and to what effects? How have human and ecological health affected environmental politics? How have writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? What can we learn from case studies of health and environment in Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay as well as in global contexts? Course topics will include ecology, epigenetics, toxicity, agriculture and food, radiation, air quality, and more-than-human entanglements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, Nicole
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The University and Society
AS.190.471 (01)

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Shaffer 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.339 (01)Sex, Death, and Gender: The Body in Premodern Art, Medicine, and Culture, c. 1300-1600TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAllsopp, Ben WilliamGilman 119HART-RENBAR, MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (01)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (02)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (03)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (04)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMRagab, AhmedGilman 132MSCH-HUM
AS.140.301 (01)History of Science: Antiquity To RenaissanceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPrincipe, LawrenceAmes 234MSCH-HUM
AS.140.301 (02)History of Science: Antiquity To RenaissanceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPrincipe, LawrenceAmes 234MSCH-HUM
AS.140.317 (01)The Hydrologic Sphere: Histories of Water in the Colonial and Postcolonial WorldTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBrig, Kristin VictoriaShriver Hall Board RoomINST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.140.327 (01)Science and UtopiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKargon, Robert HGilman 300MSCH-HUM
AS.140.329 (01)Women, Health, and Medicine in Colonial and Antebellum AmericaTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMClark, Emily JeannineGilman 108MSCH-HUM
AS.140.335 (01)Photography in Science and Medicine (19th Century-Present)MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMercelis, Joris Hans AngeleGilman 300
AS.140.338 (01)Unsafe America: Accidents, Disasters, and Society, 1800–2020MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMParry, Alexander IanHodson 301MSCH-HUM
AS.140.411 (01)Senior Research SeminarMercelis, Joris Hans Angele 
AS.145.106 (01)Health, Science, EnvironmentT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, NicoleShaffer 303MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.145.106 (02)Health, Science, EnvironmentT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, NicoleShaffer 303MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.145.106 (03)Health, Science, EnvironmentT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, NicoleShaffer 303MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.145.106 (04)Health, Science, EnvironmentT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBedran, Marina, Jiang, Lijing, Labruto, NicoleShaffer 303MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.471 (01)The University and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert HShaffer 100INST-AP, POLI-AP